CoLAB
Research-Creation and Social Justice

Monthly Meetings


Dec
7
3:00 PM15:00

Reading Discussion of "Materializing Climate Change: Images of Exposure, States of Exception"

Join the CoLAB on Friday, December 7 (3-5pm) to investigate the theme of “Materializing Climate Change”.

This meeting will feature a reading of Dr. Nicole Shukin’s 2015 article “Materializing Climate Change: Image of Exposure, States of Exception”, followed by a discussion of how both artistic and scientific representations might be mobilized in order to produce moving, material images of the historical crisis of climate change. 

How might we materialize climate change through visual research, and what role might such visualizations play in influencing broader actions (or lack thereof)? What are both the potentials AND limitations of such research? 

As always, this gathering is open to all and will be a chance to informally discuss the difficult problematic of visualizing/materializing climate change given the various crises of representation characteristic of academic research today. 

Date: Friday, December 7, 2018
Location: CoLAB Space - 3-91 Fine Arts Building, UofA

Reading

Listen to a Read & Record of Shukin’s article through the Just Powers podcast! 

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Oct
26
1:00 PM13:00

Energy Imaginaries + The Perfect Storm: Energy Transition Game

On behalf of the Social Justice + Research-Creation CoLABoratory (CoLAB) in partnership with the Intermedia Research Studio and the Space and Culture Research Group, we are excited to invite you to an interactive workshop that will explore energy imaginaries!

This event will feature a test-run of the Perfect Storm: Feminist Energy Transition role-playing game, developed by Dr. Sourayan Mookerjea. The Perfect Storm game enables players to explore the cultural and class politics of energy transition in Canada, while also providing an opportunity to examine gamification as an instrument of spectacular participation. How might you prevent a ‘perfect storm’ of ongoing climate change events through energy transition politics and policy? 

When: Friday, October 26, 1-4 PM
Where: Arts-Based Research Studio, University of Alberta, Education Building North, 4-104

Readings
For a primer on energy transition, check out the Just Powers podcast! The first iteration of the podcast features a series of ‘Read & Records’ (or ‘R&Rs’) that highlight scholarly work by feminist and decolonial scholars in relation to ecological issues. The links below feature work related specifically to energy transition:

Energy Imaginaries Poster
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Jan
26
3:00 PM15:00

THE FUTURE OF FOOD IS ___________. (A Speculative Dinner Party)

January's CoLAB Meeting features a very special event hosted by Danika Jorgensen-Skakum & Jessie Beier. 

Please join us for a speculative ‘dinner party’ experience designed to generate conversation and research-creation trajectories on ‘the future of food’ through consumption, olfaction, and the pleasure of a shared meal. Inspired by the sumptuous multi-course meal served on the RMS Titanic before it went down (in both history and to the bottom of the ocean), each of the courses served in this experimental tasting menu will gesture to potential food futures and the complex negotiations constituting our daily lives in the so-called Anthropocene. 

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Dec
1
3:00 PM15:00

Reading Discussion of "Caliban and the Witch" by Silvia Federici

"Caliban and the Witch is a history of the body in the transition to capitalism. Moving from the peasant revolts of the late Middle Ages to the witch-hunts and the rise of mechanical philosophy, Federici investigates the capitalist rationalization of social reproduction. She shows how the battle against the rebel body and mind are essential conditions for the development of labor power and self-ownership, two central principles of modern social organization."

MORE INFO

READ: Witchtales: An Interview with Silvia Federici

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Oct
20
3:00 PM15:00

Reading Discussion on the theme of Relationships + Research-Creation Beyond Settler Sexuality

This meeting will be hosted by CoLABorators Dr. Kim TallBear and Kirsten Lindquist, who have also selected the readings this time around. 

This month's readings for discussion include:

Zoe Todd, "Relationships" Cultural Anthropology https://culanth.org/fieldsights/799-relationships 

Kim TallBear, "Making Love and Relations Beyond Settler Sexuality"

The Critical Polyamorist, "Tipi Confessions: A Research-Creation Laboratory" Critical Polyamorist Blog http://www.criticalpolyamorist.com/homeblog/tipi-confessions-a-research-creation-laboratory

Scott Morgensen, "Settler Homonationalism: Theorizing Settler Colonialism within Queer Modernities" GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies

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Sep
22
3:00 PM15:00

Reading Discussion of Alexis Shotwell's "Against Purity: Living Ethically in Compromised Times"

"Why contamination and compromise might be a starting point for doing something, instead of a reason to give up.

In Against Purity, Alexis Shotwell proposes a powerful new conception of social movements as custodians for the past and incubators for liberated futures. Against Purity undertakes an analysis that draws on theories of race, disability, gender, and animal ethics as a foundation for an innovative approach to the politics and ethics of responding to systemic problems."

READ: The Folly of 'Purity Politics': An Interview with Alexis Shotwell

MORE INFO

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Reading Discussion of Jonathan Lear's "Radical Hope" (2006)
Apr
27
3:00 PM15:00

Reading Discussion of Jonathan Lear's "Radical Hope" (2006)

"Shortly before he died, Plenty Coups, the last great Chief of the Crow Nation, told his story—up to a certain point. “When the buffalo went away the hearts of my people fell to the ground,” he said, “and they could not lift them up again. After this nothing happened.” It is precisely this point—that of a people faced with the end of their way of life—that prompts the philosophical and ethical inquiry pursued in Radical Hope. In Jonathan Lear’s view, Plenty Coups’s story raises a profound ethical question that transcends his time and challenges us all: how should one face the possibility that one’s culture might collapse?

This is a vulnerability that affects us all—insofar as we are all inhabitants of a civilization, and civilizations are themselves vulnerable to historical forces. How should we live with this vulnerability? Can we make any sense of facing up to such a challenge courageously? Using the available anthropology and history of the Indian tribes during their confinement to reservations, and drawing on philosophy and psychoanalytic theory, Lear explores the story of the Crow Nation at an impasse as it bears upon these questions—and these questions as they bear upon our own place in the world. His book is a deeply revealing, and deeply moving, philosophical inquiry into a peculiar vulnerability that goes to the heart of the human condition."

MORE INFO

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Reading Discussion of Félix Guattari's "The Three Ecologies" (2000)
Mar
24
3:00 PM15:00

Reading Discussion of Félix Guattari's "The Three Ecologies" (2000)

"Extending the definition of ecology to encompass social relations and human subjectivity as well as environmental concerns, The Three Ecologies argues that the ecological crises that threaten our planet are the direct result of the expansion of a new form of capitalism and that a new ecosophical approach must be found which respects the differences between all living systems."

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Skill-Building Sound Explorations with Sound Artist Raylene Campbell (TBC)
Feb
24
3:00 PM15:00

Skill-Building Sound Explorations with Sound Artist Raylene Campbell (TBC)

"Raylene Campbell is a sound artist who embraces various creative practices including improvisation, composition, performance art, sound and image, public intervention, and Deep Listening. She studied/worked as a freelance artist in New York and Montreal from 2000 to 2009, has a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College, and taught in the Department of Music at Concordia University. The focus of Raylene’s creative process involves explorations of acoustic ecology, psychogeography, computer interactive technology, and audience interactivity in both performance and installation environments. Raylene is currently based in Edmonton.

Raylene’s improvised performance is built on a search for subtle sound textures, mixing instrumental samples and found sound, performed with Ableton Live and Therevox. Raylene gently moves into chosen sonic spaces and takes time exploring and experimenting with the emerging materials of the improvisational moment.

Check out Raylene’s Bandcamp page to hear her recent work and her Soundcloud page to hear her older work."

MORE INFO ON RAYLENE CAMPBELL

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Reading Discussion of Donna Haraway's Staying With the Trouble
Jan
27
3:00 PM15:00

Reading Discussion of Donna Haraway's Staying With the Trouble

"In the midst of spiraling ecological devastation, multispecies feminist theorist Donna J. Haraway offers provocative new ways to reconfigure our relations to the earth and all its inhabitants. She eschews referring to our current epoch as the Anthropocene, preferring to conceptualize it as what she calls the Chthulucene, as it more aptly and fully describes our epoch as one in which the human and nonhuman are inextricably linked in tentacular practices. The Chthulucene, Haraway explains, requires sym-poiesis, or making-with, rather than auto-poiesis, or self-making. Learning to stay with the trouble of living and dying together on a damaged earth will prove more conducive to the kind of thinking that would provide the means to building more livable futures. Theoretically and methodologically driven by the signifier SF—string figures, science fact, science fiction, speculative feminism, speculative fabulation, so far—Staying with the Trouble further cements Haraway's reputation as one of the most daring and original thinkers of our time."

READ: Tentacular Thinking: Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene by Donna Haraway

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 Humans are the entitled minority in the face of the sixth great extinction. Copyright: Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oregon

Humans are the entitled minority in the face of the sixth great extinction. Copyright: Oregon Institute of Marine Biology, University of Oregon

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Discussion of two films: "The Yes Men Fix the World" (2009) and "The Yes Men are Revolting!" (2015)
Dec
9
2:00 PM14:00

Discussion of two films: "The Yes Men Fix the World" (2009) and "The Yes Men are Revolting!" (2015)

The Yes Men Fix the World (2009)

THE YES MEN FIX THE WORLD is a screwball true story about two gonzo political activists who, posing as top executives of giant corporations, lie their way into big business conferences and pull off the world's most outrageous pranks.

The Yes Men Are Revolting! (2015)

Comedy troupe The Yes Men stage phony events and press releases in an effort to bring attention to environmental dangers and corporate greed.

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